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Facilitated Academic Misconduct

Review the definitions, examples and case studies below.

Facilitated Academic Misconduct 

Definition

Uploading and sharing any course materials (e.g., assignment, test, exam), to a third-party website (e.g., Course Hero, Chegg, etc.) that is not allowed to be distributed, or uploading one's own assignment to a third-party website (e.g., Course Hero, Chegg, etc.) that is then taken and submitted by another student for credit. 

Examples

  • Uploading testing materials to a third-party website (e.g., Course Hero, Chegg, etc.).
  • Uploading material to a third-party website (e.g., Course Hero, Chegg, etc.) that contains Conestoga copyrighted material (e.g., instructions, templates, rubrics, outlines, etc.). 
  • Uploading work (e.g., assignment, test, exam, etc.) to a third-party website (e.g., Course Hero, Chegg, etc.); another student took that work and submitted it as their own. 

Case Study

George has recently completed the online midterm exam for his Microeconomics course. George is not confident that he did well on the exam. In order to feel comfortable with his answers, George decides to check his exams answers by uploading and sharing the exam questions and answers on Course Hero. By doing so, George has intentionally uploaded testing materials to a third-party site and has facilitated academic misconduct.